Sunday, January 6, 2008

Resisting my Second Life Avatar

I've been doing very little commuting over the past few weeks (this will change mid-January), but I have been doing a lot of thinking. 

And one of the things I've been pondering is my complete lack of interest in participating in Second Life. Second Life seems really  silly to me. There, I said it. I keep reading about how fantastic it is, but I just can't get myself to join. I don't want to analyze this too deeply right now, because I'm trying to be open minded and would like to overcome my present skepticism. 

What I've really been thinking about is not how ridiculous Second Life is, but how participation in it may not be a complete waste of time with regards to library technology. I feel roughly the same about a lot of neat online tricks and tools -- that some day I may think of a highly  useful application merely by being exposed to them now.

This is why I need to take a deep breath and join Second Life, and it's also why I'm taking a computer programming class this spring. Both of these will help me understand how things work, and hopefully they will reveal possibilities I wasn't aware of previously. 

I know not all librarians have this attitude toward what is essentially play. But I wonder if that's somewhere they're missing. Admittedly it's a strange thing to expect from a manager -- tolerance for participation in activities that are usually considered for leisure time only. (But then again those boundaries are changing rapidly -- who says I shouldn't look at facebook at work if I regularly check my work email from home?) I'm lucky in that tomorrow I start a new job description with a boss who I'm pretty sure understands this.

2 comments:

  1. Fine with me if you play on Second Life while at work for a bit of the time.

    the boss.

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  2. My experience has been that the ratio of what is silly to what is useful and educational on SL is way too low. However, the useful/educational parts do show a lot of potential.

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